Monday – April 19

 
9:00 AM – 9:40 AM
Antidotes You Need to Know
Richard Cantor, MD, FACEP, FAAP
 
Supportive care may lull you into a false sense of security in poisonings. When a toxin has a viable antidote, you better know how and when to use it! Come learn what you need to do before you leave the bedside.
 

Objectives:

  • List must-know antidotes in pediatric poisonings
  • Discuss the major indications for antidotes
  • Identify potential contraindications for antidotes
  • Recognize the toxidrome to direct care
  • Discuss the practicalities of administering antidotes
9:40 AM – 10:20 AM
Pediatric Major Trauma: Priorities and Perspective
Christopher S. Amato, MD, FACEP, FAAP
 
Traumatic injuries are still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. Being facile and adept at the assessment and management of children presenting after traumatic events is unquestionably important. In order to deliver excellent care to these children, it is critical that the pediatric anatomic and physiologic differences compared to adults be understood. Additionally, knowledge of the current literature will help distinguish which patients may not benefit from advanced imaging. The presenter to discuss how to approach these challenging cases to ensure potential hazards are avoided.
 

Objectives:

  • Recognize the challenges that are inherent in the management of the pediatric trauma patient
  • Describe how the anatomic and physiologic differences that exist in pediatric patients affect the management of pediatric trauma
  • Weigh the risk versus the benefits of radiological imagining in the setting of pediatric trauma
  • Discuss blood transfusion in the pediatric traumatized patient
  • Discuss other modalities of care
10:20 AM – 11:00 AM
Controlling Asthma Before it Controls You
Christopher S. Amato, MD, FACEP, FAAP
 
This course will describe an evidence-based approach to improve oxygenation and ventilation in pediatric patients with severe asthma as well as discuss the potential pros and cons of using non-invasive ventilation in the pediatric patient with severe asthma.
 

Objectives:

  • Discuss 1st and 2nd line therapy principles
  • Review current evidence for this or how to improve care
  • Describe the role of rescue therapies with NIPPV and HFNC in the management of severe asthma
  • Discuss the role of adjuncts
  • Discuss latest treatments
 
11:00 AM – 11:40 AM
Airway Tricks of the Trade
Marianne Gausche-Hill, MD, FACEP, FAAP, FAEMS
 
Management of the pediatric airway can be a challenge as the approach changes with the age of the child. The speaker will present the “tricks of the trade” and provide tools that will assist the emergency clinician in pediatric airway management. Current strategies and controversies will be discussed including determining endotracheal tube size, use of video laryngoscopy in intubation, RSI medications, use of high flow nasal oxygen during RSI, and various airway alternatives including supraglottic airways.
 

Objectives:

  • Describe clinical scenarios and the variety of pediatric airway management approaches available
  • Outline an algorithmic approach to airway management by age of the child
  • Discuss the latest updates and tools for the airway management of children
  • Discuss rescue devices
  • Review techniques for proper endotracheal tube placement
11:40 AM – 1:00 PM – Lunch Break
 
1:00 PM – 1:40 PM
Status Epilepticus
Alfred D. Sacchetti, MD, FACEP
 
A two-year-old girl is brought to ED in status epilepticus. What are management strategies after the use of benzodiazepines? What should be the second line agent? When is airway management needed? The speaker will discuss the latest evidence for the management of infants and children in status epilepticus.
 

Objectives:

  • Contrast the approach to management of status epilepticus in neonates, infants, and children
  • Outline an algorithm for management based on the latest evidence
  • Describe indications and techniques in airway management and continuous EEG monitoring
  • Discuss the differential diagnosis for the cause of status epilepticus
  • Describe the time-sensitive nature of treatment via the kindling phenomenon
1:40 PM – 2:20 PM
Shock Recognition and First Steps
James (Jim) Homme, MD, FACEP
 
Recognition and initial management of children in septic shock is both vital for a child’s survival and challenging for the emergency clinician. This expert lecturer will describe the latest guidelines for the recognition and emergency management of children in septic shock. Controversies in the use of biomarkers, fluid resuscitation, use of vasopressors, and antibiotic therapy will be discussed.
 

Objectives:

  • Outline the latest recommendations in the care of children with septic shock
  • Discuss controversies such as fluid resuscitation and use of blood products (LR vs NS; when to transfuse)
  • Describe evaluation and diagnostic studies that are recommended
  • Describe the timing and type of antimicrobial therapy that should be initiated
2:20 PM – 2:40 PM
The Sick Neonate
Alfred D. Sacchetti, MD, FACEP
 
Very little strikes fear in the heart of the emergency provider more than a neonate. Assessment of these little creatures may prove challenging to the most experienced clinician. Neonatal respiratory distress may be caused by infectious, cardiac, metabolic, or benign etiologies. Deadly conditions initially may appear benign. Developing an awareness of subtle but fatal diagnoses is vital to emergency physicians. It is important that the emergency clinician is aware of the key neonatal deadly diagnoses where early intervention can dramatically reduce morbidity and mortality.
 

Objectives:

  • List subtle and overt symptoms and outline initial diagnostic evaluation and therapy for suspected inborn errors of metabolism
  • Recognize findings concerning critical congenital heart lesions
  • Identify exam findings concerning neonatal herpes and pertussis and describe workup and treatment for these conditions
  • Identify pitfalls in the evaluation of the sick infant
  • Discuss "lessons learned" in the care of the sick infant
2:40 PM – 3:20 PM 
Cardiac Arrhythmias: Don’t Care What it is, Just Want to Treat It
Mimi Lu, MD, FACEP
 
Children can be very imaginative in the cardiac rhythms they generate. Although numerous convoluted criteria exist to diagnose these rhythms their actual treatments are relatively few. This session will present how any arrhythmia can be treated with just two medications, some electricity, a wire, and an emergency physician. 
 
Objectives:
 
  • Describe the pathophysiology of arrhythmias in infancy and childhood
  • Recognize and diagnose the most common pediatric rhythm disturbances
  • Provide timely and effective interventions to remedy the anomalies
3:20 PM – 4:00 PM
Ortho Puzzlers
Ilene A Claudius, MD, FACEP
 
Traumatic injuries are one of the most common presenting complaints in the ED and children are active! Kids are NOT small adults (it had to be said) so there are anatomic and physiologic differences compared to adults. From apex to ankle the speaker will review those injuries that are not as straightforward as you may initially believe and how to approach these challenging cases to ensure that any potential puzzles are solved.
 

Objectives:

  • Describe how the anatomic and physiologic differences that exist in pediatric patients affect the management of pediatric orthopedic injury
  • Discuss growth plate-related injuries and the typical ages that they close
  • Review specific types of orthopedic injuries that are fraught with medical-legal issues and how to spot them in the first place
  • Discuss the level of urgency, emergency, and non-urgency of these conditions
  • Review the complications of these conditions

*Schedule Subject to Change