Satellite Symposia Program

Satellite Symposia programs are educational and most offer CME credit. These programs are not a part of the official ACEP17 education program as planned by ACEP’s Educational Meetings Committee.

 

Recognizing and Managing Adverse Reactions Associated with Modern Cancer Therapies: Essential Guidance for Emergency Medicine Specialists

Grantor: AstraZeneca
Saturday, October 28, 2017
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm: Dinner and Program
Marriott Marquis/Marquis Ballroom, Salon 8

The spotlight is on cancer in emergency medicine—why now, and why should you care? The oncology treatment landscape is changing— what does this mean for those working in the ED? Emergency medicine specialists are often called upon to evaluate and manage patients with a wide variety of oncologic emergencies—what are the latest recommendations and best practices to improve outcomes in these patients with cancer? These and many other interesting topics will be addressed in this interactive and engaging CME/CE satellite symposium led by Dr. Daniel Pallin.

Program Objectives. Upon successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Discuss the evolving immuno-oncology treatment landscape and the basics of cancer immunotherapy
  • Characterize the spectrum of potential immune-mediated adverse reactions (IMARs), including organ systems impacted, presenting symptoms, and timing of occurrence
  • Describe the latest recommendations for evaluation, grading, and management of IMARs, inclusive of special considerations for emergency care settings
  • Implement recommended strategies for IMAR recognition/detection and management in emergency care settings, while following best practices for team-based, multidisciplinary, patient-centric care

The faculty will be Daniel Pallin, MD, PhD, Michael Postow, MD, and Marianne Davies, DNP, ACNP, AOCNP.

This CME/CE activity is jointly provided by Medical Learning Institute, Inc. and PVI, PeerView Institute for Medical Education.

Accreditation Statement

The Medical Learning Institute, Inc. is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

The Medical Learning Institute, Inc. designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit Information

Purpose:
The purpose of this activity is to improve the knowledge and competence of nurses concerning recognition, evaluation, and management of oncologic emergencies in patients with cancer presenting to emergency departments.
Credits:
1.5 contact hour(s).
Accreditation Statement
Medical Learning Institute, Inc.
Provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing,
Provider Number 15106, for 1.5 contact hour(s).

This activity is supported by an independent educational grant from AstraZeneca.

 

Troponin T Gen 5 and Emergency Medicine: From the Heart

Grantor: Roche Diagnostics Corporation
Sunday, October 29, 2017
6:00 am – 8:00 am: Breakfast and Program
Marriott Marquis/Marquis Ballroom, Salon 8

More than 7 million patients with chest pain present to EDs annually in the US. While these patients account for almost 25% of hospital admissions, only a small portion are ultimately diagnosed with AMI. Evaluation of these patients is time-consuming and costly, and the US spends $10 to $12 billion annually for these workups. The ability to rapidly identify AMI is critical for quality care and for improving patient outcomes. It also offers the ED the opportunity to rule-out AMI more quickly and to facilitate ED decision-making processes. In conjunction with electrocardiogram and clinical assessment, cardiac biomarkers continue to be essential in the diagnosis of AMI. High sensitive-cardiac Troponin assays have been widely used outside of the US for almost a decade. In January 2017, the FDA cleared the first high sensitive-cardiac Troponin assay for use in the US. Because of its enhanced analytics and strong negative predictive value, the Elecsys Troponin T Gen 5 (Roche) has the potential to significantly impact the care of these patients. Drs. Richard Nowak and Jim McCord (Henry Ford Hospital; Detroit, MI) will present the results of their REACTION-US study involving serial draws of Troponin T Gen 5 in patients suspected of having ACS.

Program Objectives. Upon successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Discuss the current state of ED care for patients with chest pain
  • Review the package insert, analytics and approved indication for Troponin T Gen 5
  • Present the results and potential impact of the REACTION-US study
  • Discuss the steps necessary to implement Troponin T Gen 5 into clinical care

The faculty will be Richard Nowak, MD and James McCord, MD.

This non-CME symposium is supported by a grant from Roche Diagnostics Corporation.

 

Management of Immune-related Adverse Events in Patients Treated with Immune Oncology Agents: Role of Emergency Physicians in the Multidisciplinary Team

Grantor: Bristol Myers Squibb
Monday, October 30, 2017
6:00 am – 8:00 am: Breakfast and Program
Marriott Marquis/Marquis Ballroom, Salon 4

Surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy have been the main weapons against cancer for more than 50 years. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a novel way of fighting cancer. In the tumor microenvironment, immunosuppressive molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), and programmed cell death protein (PD-1) and its ligand PD-L1 help the tumor to evade immune attack. A class of novel immune oncology agents block these immune checkpoints, thereby reactivating cytotoxic T cells to destroy tumor cells. Several immunotherapeutic agents are now FDA-approved, with several more in clinical trials. With these agents has emerged a new spectrum of dysimmune toxicity due to immune checkpoint blockade. Management of these immunotherapy related adverse events (IRAEs) requires close collaboration between specialties. Join our cancer expert, Dr. Arjun Balar, as he reviews the evolving landscape of cancer immunotherapy and consequent management of IRAEs. Clinical trial-derived efficacy and safety data will be discussed, with attention given to adverse events, their identification, and management strategies. This learning opportunity features case-based presentation with a Q&A session that encourages attendees to maximize their learning and explore this evolving area of cancer treatment.

Program Objectives. Upon successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Critically evaluate clinical data of emerging PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors, with a focus on the unique type, incidence, classification and organ distribution of immune-related adverse events (irAEs)
  • Describe how to reach a diagnosis of immune related adverse events due to immuneoncology agents and current recommendations for their management
  • Discuss the role of emergency care physicians in the multidisciplinary recognition of the signs and symptoms of immune-related adverse events and their management to standard of care therapy

The faculty will be Arjun Balar, MD.

This activity is provided by Med Learning Group. This activity is co-provided by Ultimate Medical Academy/CCM.

Accreditation Statement

Med Learning Group is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement

Med Learning Group designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Nursing Credit Information

Purpose:
This program would be beneficial for nurses involved in the care of cancer.
Credits:
1.50 ANCC Contact Hour(s)
Accreditation Statement
Ultimate Medical Academy/CCM is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. Awarded 1.50 contact hour(s) of continuing nursing education of RNs and APNs.

This activity is supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Bristol Myers Squibb.

 

Strike Back Against Snake Bite: Current Strategies and New Evidence in the Management of North American Pit Viper Envenomation

Grantor: BTG International Inc.
Monday, October 30, 2017
6:00 pm – 9:00 pm: Dinner and Program
Marriott Marquis/Marquis Ballroom, Salon 4

Approximately 5,000 to 9,000 people seek emergency care in the United States for crotaline snakebites annually, including rattlesnake, cottonmouth, and copperhead envenomation. The mainstay of care for North American pit viper envenomation is Fab antivenom. Join experts, Dr. Charles Gerardo, Chief of Emergency Medicine at Duke University, and Dr. Eric Lavonas, Director, Denver Health Emergency Department, for a comprehensive review of the best practices in medical management of crotaline envenomation in the US. In addition, recently published data from a randomized controlled trial in copperhead envenomation will be shared with the aim to provide evidence of the benefit of antivenom therapy in limb recovery following envenomation.

Program Objectives. Upon successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Present current best practices in North American pit viper envenomation management.
  • Present new evidence on recovery from copperhead snake envenomation.
  • Provide evidence and rationale for shared decision making in mild snake envenomation.

The faculty will be Eric Lavonas, MD and Charles Gerardo, MD.

This non-CME symposium is supported by a grant from BTG International, Inc.

 

The Multidisciplinary PERT: A New Standard of Care for Acute Pulmonary Embolism

Grantor: Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Sponsor: National PERT Consortium™, Inc.
Tuesday, October 31, 2017
6:00 am – 8:00 am: Breakfast and Program
Marriott Marquis/Marquis Ballroom, Salon 4

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a life-threatening condition that affects people of all ages and health statuses, from the most fit athletes to the most infirm patients. Detection of PE, “the great masquerader,” is challenging because its signs and symptoms are often subtle and mimic those of other disease states. Once PE is diagnosed, clinicians have little guidance in choosing from the wide array of therapies available because:

  • No accepted algorithm exists to guide diagnostic and therapeutic decision making
  • Outcomes data and evaluation for available therapies are lacking
  • Care rendered to PE patients is fragmented among different clinical services
  • Assessment of bleeding and other risks remains daunting
  • Long-term effects of PE are poorly understood, though they can be severely debilitating

In the face of these challenges, multidisciplinary rapid-response programs – “Pulmonary Embolism Response Teams”, or “PERT’s” – have been established at many institutions across the US and abroad. PERTs promote coordination among specialists who care for PE patients. The PERT initiative has gained significant traction, leading to the establishment of a 501c3 Not for Profit organization, dedicated to improving outcomes for PE through collaboration in research, educational programs, management protocols, and dissemination of information about PE amongst member institutions, as well as increasing public awareness of PE and its prevention.
PERT programs hold the promise to:

  • Improve interdisciplinary communication and collaboration
  • Facilitate timely decision-making to enhance care
  • Enable systematic collection and evaluation of data related to PE treatment and outcomes
The goals of this satellite symposium are to improve PE diagnosis, care coordination, and treatment, while expanding our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms and long-term follow-up strategies for patients with PE. In addition, the patient perspective will be presented.

Program Objectives. Upon successful completion of this educational activity, participants should be better able to:

  • Understand the scope of pulmonary embolism as a major cause of morbidity and mortality
  • Recognize the benefits of the multidisciplinary approach to PE management
  • Describe the full spectrum of treatments available for acute pulmonary embolism - medical, surgical, and endovascular – and the wide variations in management
  • Diagnose CTEPH and describe the current treatment options
  • Create a Pulmonary Embolism Response Team (PERT)
  • Understand the potential for the National PERT Consortium to improve awareness and outcomes for patients with PE

The faculty will include: Christopher Kabrhel, MD; Jeffrey Kline, MD; Victor Tapson, MD; Richard, Channick, MD; Kenneth Rosenfield, MD; Rachel Rosovsky, MD (preliminary list)

This non-CME activity is provided by the National PERT Consortium™, Inc., supported by an unrestricted educational grant from Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

 

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