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MUSE - Medical Humanities Section Newsletter - Spring 2017

Spring Fling

 

From the Chair: Medical Humanities at the Bedside—Coming Soon

BaruchBaseball is in the air. Crocuses are nosing up in the garden. In New England, this means only another two months before I can finally stash away my gloves and ski hat for the season. 

This spring, however, brings a particular excitement—the finishing touches and the launch of our project, Medical Humanities at the Bedside.

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Creative Writing Award Winner 2016

Breast 

Giggling as the ocean sprayed my feet, 
and proud of the sturdy castle
I built with my mother, 
I would run on the sand, 
wildly under the hot summer sun, 
With skin free to the air, 
Chest bare- and free.

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The Lure of Tropical Medicine: Ten Days in Niger

Sunday, February 5th
I arrived late at night via Turkish Airways, an airline which consistently provides excellent service, food, and entertainment. As an added bonus, their airport hub in Istanbul is a fabulous airport with a variety of wonderful shops and services. I was met by Jeremy Beebout and Chacko at the Niamey airport, which is a classic African airstrip with minimal services. There was a local official on the plane who was met on the tarmac by a private car, while the rest of us were bussed to the terminal for passport control. No problems encountered, and I was quickly shown to my apartment where I proceeded to crash. Hard.

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Adenosine Birds on a Wire

Birds

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Cover3

Cover3

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From The Editor

This issue of MUSE, the newsletter of ACEP’s Medical Humanities Section, contains food for the eye, as well as food for the brain. There are wonderful photographs and artworks from our 2016 Visual Arts Competition. The winner was Dr. Vijay Kannan and his photograph “Deadvlei.” To herald the coming of spring there is a captivating and colorful photo by Dr. Kay Moody, “Butterfly.” Dr. Lindsay Ball (see previous issues) teases the ER-Eye again with her work “Adenosine Birds on a Wire” and Dr. Jane Yee puts color and form together in her artwork “Cover-3.” I feel she gently evokes Peter Max in this piece.

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Visual Arts Award Winner 2016: Deadvlei

Deadvlei_2

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Letting Ali Die

Ali* was on bed 16. He was 10 months old and critically sick. Till the day before, per his mother, Ali had been quite normal. He had been taken to a neighbor’s house by the neighbor’s daughter. This was not the first time the neighbor’s child had carried Ali to her house, to play with him. However, what was different this time around was that the child brought Ali back soon after taking him, presumably because he was fussy. That occurrence in itself could have been a potent reminder for the parents to suspect something. The parents, unfortunately, let hours pass assuming that Ali was just colicky. When Ali went from being fussy to lethargic his parents panicked and rushed him to a nearby clinic. That facility was far from optimal to take care of the baby, given his critical condition, hence the parents decided to bring Ali to the emergency room (ER). Ali was in a terrible condition hence he was rushed directly to ‘resus’ (resuscitation or shock room). He was gasping, periodically, and there was hardly any movement of his body, none of his eyes. These were ominous signs. Ali was immediately ‘tubed’ (intubated) and moved to the CT-scanner. What that revealed was a massive bleed in his brain and infarcted (dead) brain tissue.

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Butterfly

Butterfly

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